Frances stonor saunders who paid the piper pdf

A photo showing the head and shoulders of a middle-aged man with black hair and a slim moustache. George Frances stonor saunders who paid the piper pdf, was an English novelist, essayist, journalist, and critic. Orwell wrote literary criticism, poetry, fiction, and polemical journalism. Eric Arthur Blair was born on 25 June 1903, in Motihari, Bihar, in British India.

In 1904, Ida Blair settled with her children at Henley-on-Thames in Oxfordshire. Eric was brought up in the company of his mother and sisters, and apart from a brief visit in mid-1907, they did not see the husband and father Richard Blair until 1912. Before the First World War, the family moved to Shiplake, Oxfordshire where Eric became friendly with the Buddicom family, especially their daughter Jacintha. When they first met, he was standing on his head in a field. On being asked why, he said, “You are noticed more if you stand on your head than if you are right way up. Blair’s time at the school inspired his essay “Such, Such Were the Joys”.

At the age of five, Eric was sent as a day-boy to a convent school in Henley-on-Thames, which Marjorie also attended. It was a Roman Catholic convent run by French Ursuline nuns, who had been exiled from France after religious education was banned in 1903. While at St Cyprian’s, Blair wrote two poems that were published in the Henley and South Oxfordshire Standard. In January, Blair took up the place at Wellington, where he spent the Spring term.

In May 1917 a place became available as a King’s Scholar at Eton. He remained at Eton until December 1921, when he left midway between his 18th and 19th birthday. Wellington was “beastly”, Orwell told his childhood friend Jacintha Buddicom, but he said he was “interested and happy” at Eton. Blair’s maternal grandmother lived at Moulmein, so he chose a posting in Burma. In October 1922 he sailed on board SS Herefordshire via the Suez Canal and Ceylon to join the Indian Imperial Police in Burma. Working as an imperial police officer gave him considerable responsibility while most of his contemporaries were still at university in England.

When he was posted farther east in the Delta to Twante as a sub-divisional officer, he was responsible for the security of some 200,000 people. In Burma, Blair acquired a reputation as an outsider. He spent much of his time alone, reading or pursuing non-pukka activities, such as attending the churches of the Karen ethnic group. In April 1926 he moved to Moulmein, where his maternal grandmother lived. At the end of that year, he was assigned to Katha in Upper Burma, where he contracted dengue fever in 1927. In England, he settled back in the family home at Southwold, renewing acquaintance with local friends and attending an Old Etonian dinner.